Jeremy Lin: Bad Fit for Re-Building Hawks

Recently, the ATL Hawks traded a 2020 2nd round draft pick and Isaia Cordinier for veteran point guard, Jeremy Lin. On the surface, this trade looks like a steal for the Hawks whom had a disastrous 2017-18 season. Rest assured, though, this trade will not help Atlanta progress quicker towards the future.

With the likes of point guard Dennis Schroeder and intriguing prospect Trae Young, how  will Jeremy Lin, the third starting-caliber point guard for the ATL Hawks fit on their roster? Bottom line is, he won’t… and here’s why. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve been a Lin fan since ‘Lin-sanity’ in 2012, but adding yet another ball-dominant guard will do nothing beneficial for the inexperienced Hawks.

Not only will there not be enough touches to go around on the team, but adding Lin will hinder the growth of the younger and more athletic Hawks. Atlanta is now building their roster around youthful and promising athletes filled with untapped potential. Adding a veteran such as Jeremy means less experience, court time, and touches for the young gunners. Lin also burdens the team with a sizeable contract of $12.5 Million per year.

Yet, despite many cons, Jeremy has always been a good presence in the locker room. Previous NBA teammates have grown quite fond of him, actually. He brings good character to every team and even prides himself in being a Christian. He has also not brought any documented issues to any team before, so there is a good possibility that he will find a niche on this Hawks roster. In order to do this though, he must accept a smaller role on the court and become a mentor for the other two point guards who are supposed to become the franchise face for the Hawks.

Hopefully this trade works out for both Lin & Atlanta, of which both parties are  searching for success in the Eastern Conference. As for now, unfortunately, it seems this new addition will only clog up the growth for this inexperienced and win-depraved team.

 

 

 

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